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Joined duela 2 urte
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Cake day: ots. 20, 2021

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Not wasting any timber here! Folding table crafted out of a single block of wood.


**"Mr Rolles was arrested in late June, when he was pulled off the street in Sydney for allegedly blocking roads and obstructing traffic."** > Since late June, Greg Rolles must produce on demand his computer and mobile phone for police inspection, and tell them his passwords. > > He is not allowed to use any encrypted messaging apps, like Signal or WhatsApp. He can only have one mobile phone. > [...] > > These are the strict technology-related bail conditions imposed on some Blockade Australia climate protesters — a development legal experts have criticised as "unusual" and "extreme". > [...] > > Defence lawyer Mark Davis, who is representing some of the Blockade Australia activists, said the vagueness of the prohibition was concerning. > > "It used to name the things you couldn't have, and then they made it all encrypted communication," he said. > > "It could be you're on your PlayStation." > > He also takes issue with the non-association rules, and the lack of specificity about what an "association" might be. > Mr Davis said one of his clients had been pulled in by police after they reacted with a "thumbs up" emoji to Facebook comments [...]
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Another option is to use a filesystem such as btrfs or zfs which stores checksums in metadata, then use the included tools to verify file integrity and identify bit rot.

https://btrfs.readthedocs.io/en/latest/btrfs-scrub.html

https://openzfs.github.io/openzfs-docs/man/8/zpool-scrub.8.html


If in doubt about the brilliance of this phone, have a watch of these videos by engineer behind this phone:


It’s a non-mass-produced functional art piece. The price seems reasonable for what it is, not for what conventional functions it performs.


> Victoria’s Department of Education [Australia] is expanding its monitoring of devices’ internal traffic from staff to students' own devices at a number of schools. > > The expansion will result in Zscaler SSL root certificates being installed on not only school-provided devices, but students’ personal devices if they connect locally to a school network. > >**The certificate allows student browser traffic to be decrypted for inspection, while still presenting to the user as if they were protected by HTTPS.** > > [...]
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Great idea, need to make some new ones though. This is from a set put out about 2 years ago, and refers to websites, hashtags, etc, not in current use.


Security is a really good point. If you’re not running any screen lock then not a consideration.

Some ways to remedy the problem:



Sure, an individual can prevent their own devices collecting data about them, but the paper is about all the devices surrounding a person in other people’s pockets/homes/workplaces: collecting data on – recordingthat individual.


[…] The researchers discovered that even if individual users turned off data tracking and didn’t share their own information, their mobility patterns could still be predicted with surprising accuracy based on data collected from their acquaintances.

“Worse,” says Ghoshal, “almost as much latent information can be extracted from perfect strangers that the individual tends to co-locate with.”

In many (most?) jurisdictions it is illegal to make a recording of a conversation either which you are not party to, or without consent of all parties involved; sometimes with consideration towards whether there was reasonable expectation that the conversation be private. Even when legal, there are often restrictions on how that recording can be used.

The laws aren’t always written specific to audio/video recording (not that always-recording by google/apple/amazon/etc isn’t a problem already…) – how does such surveillance figure in to existing legislation around the world?


“The tech executive turned data justice warrior is celebrated as a truth-telling hero, but there’s something a bit too smooth about this narrative arc.” – Maria Farrell, March 5, 2020


You don’t build a conclusion for a technology based on sweeping aside risks of your favoured solution while emphasising the risks of your favoured solution, which is what you did with your “There are zero catastrophes with[…]” comment.

You lay it all out and compare the whole model.

I think laying it all out for wind, solar, hydro, and nuclear, will raise a whole lot of issues with all the technologies. Some specific models of tech will have unresolvable issues (e.g, megadams, dense solar-farms on arable land, any nuclear tech which can feed proliferation).

I suspect the whole supply/waste-chain for nuclear will have unresolvable issues, and very few of the hydro/solar will have unresolvable issues.

Trouble is getting people to agree on how to compare the risk of a well-engineered dam failing and the risk of your nuclear waste storage leaking into the water table, or a contaminated coolant pipe spraying vapour into the prevailing wind, or radioactive contaminated scrap metal making its way into the commercial steel market, or…

Anyone suggesting the thorium-pebble-bed or similar “holy-grail” 100% safe theoretical tech seems to be living between fantasy and pipe-dream.


I only mean it’s a false claim to imply that wind/water/solar energy are inherently zero catastrophe risk.

That said, I think coming close to fully understanding and assessing (and mitigating) the risk of wind/water/solar power projects/economies is far more achievable than for nuclear energy projects/economies.

Especially so when considering the unavoidable context of the (un)predictability of both humans and environment over the next 10,000 - 100,000 years.


There are zero catastrophes with wind, water or earth energy because when you shut it down, it is off and possess no further potential to harm people.

Turn the hyperbole down a little:


What the hell?

All it takes is to make an AAAA record for your domain – why would anyone not be doing that whenever they make an A record?


Internet. Sanitised for your protection. ™


  • DDG: why not signal dessalines
    • Good results.
  • DDG: dessalines why not signal
    • No good results. The hint (Not many results contain signal Search only for dessalines why "signal"?) gives a clue that not has a special interpretation and that the parsing algorithm is very confused about what it’s being told to do.

Tinfoil hat or Hanlon’s razor? :-P


I tried a couple more:

…looks like DDG has an undocumented NOT operator, which for some reason is not deactivated when in a long quote, but is deactivated when the phrase is bracketed in quoted nothings. “” “”

But still doesn’t quite explain how "why not signal" dessalines does return a result.

“regex is hard”, I guess.


Here’s an interesting snippet from the article regarding matrix’s efforts to be interoperable with existing protocols:

We could run the bridge somewhere relatively safe - e.g. the user’s client. There’s a bunch of work going on already in Matrix to run clientside bridges, so that your laptop or phone effectively maintains a connection over to iMessage or WhatsApp or whatever as if it were logged in… but then relays the messages into Matrix once re-encrypted. By decentralising the bridges and spreading them around the internet, you avoid them becoming a single honeypot that bad actors might look to attack: instead it becomes more a question of endpoint compromise (which is already a risk today).


DuckDuck..Gone: "Why not signal"
So, this is interesting. I wanted to find that essay by [@dessalines@lemmy.ml](https://lemmy.ml/u/dessalines) outlining the many issues of Signal and suggested alternatives, but DuckDuckGo had _nothing_ for me. Not on the first page, not on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th page. I thought maybe I just imagined the title, but sure enough, on searching lemmy posts, [it was right there](https://lemmy.ml/post/81033). Then I thought "hang on, there's hardly a mention let alone criticism of signal on any page of those search results!". Hmm.. the wording might be a bit ambiguous, but let's compare: - [DuckDuckGo "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/IeWpR) - NOTHING - [Google "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/j5tTb) - Plenty of results! Dessaline's essay is first up, followed by a plethora of discussions about the essay on HN, Reddit, lemmys, mastodons, and more. Not evil! ..this time. - [DuckDuckGo "why not signal" dessalines](https://archive.ph/09kpY) - Okay, so DDG has indexed it just fine. Maybe dessalines is "downranked" à la RT.com? - [DuckDuckGo "why not market socialism"](https://archive.ph/mKuAb) - Nope, finds one of dessalines' socialism essays just fine, half way down the page. All of the following except Gigablast returned a healthy list of results including the original essay: - [Qwant "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/T7EWn) - [Bing "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/MwiNa) - [Brave "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/4n1MA) - [Gigablast "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/Sjiwf) - [Mojeek "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/fRiUd) - [Startpage "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/7dhKj) - [Yandex "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/ffQLv) - [Paulgo (searxng) "why not signal"](https://archive.ph/ksOg7)
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Federation and its consequences have been a disaster for the fediverse
![](https://lemmy.ml/pictrs/image/56b30403-21a9-4bf4-8952-d679135b0a4c.png) gemini://cadence.moe/gemlog/2020-11-16-federation-and-its-consequences.bliz https://archive.ph/QvWU5
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cross-posted from: https://lemmy.ml/post/139820 > Does anyone know what this thing is? Some kind of decentralized, open source, anti-establishment, etc platform aiming to be an alternative to twitter, but we plebs aren't allowed to see or participate in the development process or even see any source repositories yet. > > To me there's a bunch of red flags, but I can't put my finger on what I reckon they're flagging. It's that combo of roll-your-own-crypto and promises of decentralization and secret-open-source-development-model all tied together with node.js and blockchain. > > No mention of other decentralization efforts, their envisaged place/relationship with the fediverse, ActivityPub, **Mastodon**, possibility of extending their new blockchain protocol ideas with other platforms. Nothing even about how they're better than the fediverse or whatever. > > They were banned from twitter tho so they "must be legit"? > The slides on the "tech" page mostly have this "COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE - NOT FOR UNAUTHORISED USE OR DISSEMINATION" watermarks, which is pretty weird. > > https://ghostarchive.org/archive/G08ek > > https://archive.is/panquake.com >
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Does anyone know what this thing is? Some kind of decentralized, open source, anti-establishment, etc platform aiming to be an alternative to twitter, but we plebs aren't allowed to see or participate in the development process or even see any source repositories yet. To me there's a bunch of red flags, but I can't put my finger on what I reckon they're flagging. It's that combo of roll-your-own-crypto and promises of decentralization and secret-open-source-development-model all tied together with node.js and blockchain. No mention of other decentralization efforts, their envisaged place/relationship with the fediverse, ActivityPub, **Mastodon**, possibility of extending their new blockchain protocol ideas with other platforms. Nothing even about how they're better than the fediverse or whatever. They were banned from twitter tho so they "must be legit"? The slides on the "tech" page mostly have this "COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE - NOT FOR UNAUTHORISED USE OR DISSEMINATION" watermarks, which is pretty weird. https://ghostarchive.org/archive/G08ek https://archive.is/panquake.com
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