• @Zerush@lemmy.ml
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    12 years ago

    In this point Windows is more secure, because it stores the password encrypted in the HD in a second Keyring, most Linux stored them in plain text. Anyway, a current mistake is to use 12345 as password in all accounts.

    • @eyeballkid@lemmy.ml
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      12 years ago

      Nowadays most (maybe all) linux distributions use etc/shadow for passwords - passwords are encrypted, not plaintext.

      • @Zerush@lemmy.ml
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        12 years ago

        You can easy test it, go to your browser settings, to passwords and click on “See password”. Doing this in Windows, it opens a Pop-up where you must put the system password before you can see the passwords stored. In last Linux I used (Kubuntu), I could see the passwords directly. Well, it was some time ago, maybe this has changed in last distros.

        • @eyeballkid@lemmy.ml
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          12 years ago

          I thought you were just writing about system passwords. I don’t save website passwords in my browser - but I’m glad that windows users have a more secure option to do so.

          • @Zerush@lemmy.ml
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            02 years ago

            Yes, Microsoft is certainly an oligopoly that abuses its position with sometimes unethical practices and Windows by default is full of all kinds of spyware and not very respectful of user privacy (although with a little knowledge you can disable these bad habits), but in point security is impeccable and perhaps one of the most secure OS currently. Apparently MS has learned a lot from the past, precisely because it is the main target of the attacks as the majority OS is. The defenses he currently incorporates are among the best on the market.

            • @eyeballkid@lemmy.ml
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              12 years ago

              It makes sense that they would need to do so, given the end-user idiocy mentioned in your other comments on this post. I know plenty of technical users of Windows, but I also know everyone else in my life who uses Windows - the technically savvy users are a rounding error.

              • @Zerush@lemmy.ml
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                12 years ago

                I think, that has nothing to do with the OS they use. A user with a basic tecnical knowledge can be secure in every OS, the user without isn’t in none of them.

        • @sacredbirdman@lemmy.ml
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          12 years ago

          If you use Firefox, password manager stores its data encrypted (not in plain text). You can also turn on the master password requirement if you like.

          • @Zerush@lemmy.ml
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            12 years ago

            Same in all other browsers, in Windows it’s encrypted anyway in a second keyring, but the lack is, that, when they create a random password, you can’t recover it in case of lost or the HD/PC goes to Valhalla. Same with all other password Manager (I know) Better and more secure to trust in a simple papernote or in your memory.